Next generation coronavirus vaccine in pill, spray forms could have these benefits, Dr. Nesheiwat explains

The coronavirus vaccine could be taking a new form as pills and possibly nasal sprays, opening up a window of new opportunities for pandemic recovery.

Fox News medical contributor and CityMD medical director Dr. Janette Nesheiwat told “Kudlow” on Monday that the wider range of options will allow patients alternatives that are right for them, including people that simply have an aversion to needles.

“This is really going to have a significant positive impact with the vaccination rollout in the country and around the world,” she said. “So to be able to get the COVID vaccine in a pill form, in a tablet form, or even in a nasal spray form is really going to go a long way and is going to help us, especially for future pandemics, for future outbreaks.”

COVID-19 PILL EFFECTIVE IN PRELIMINARY TESTING MAY BE ‘HOLY GRAIL’ OF PANDEMIC, DR. MARC SIEGEL SAYS

Nesheiwat said that these variations of inoculation could be more beneficial to patients than the traditional injectable in terms of side effects. She explained that the technology is not new and is used in other treatments such as Vivotif Oral vaccine pill for Typhoid fever which she’s witnessed last longer and provide stronger protection in patients.

“You’re going to feel better as well,” she said. “You might not have those side effects that you have with the shot.”

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

The doctor clarified that these benefits have not yet been proven in a COVID vaccine alternative but according to other treatments, they’re very likely to leave less of a severe reaction.

According to The Wall Street Journal, American pharmaceutical companies like Sanofi SA, Altimmune Inc. and Gritstone Oncology Inc. are in early to middle phase testing for next-generation vaccines. These alternatives will be easier to store and ship and may have the potential to create immune responses that are longer-lasting.

A pill or nasal spray vaccine option would most likely not come to market until late 2021 or 2022 depending on the success of trials.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

Continue Reading >>> Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *